Teenager’s Problems

What are the problems faced by teenagers?
1.Depression
Depressive disorders are treatable but it’s important to seek professional help. if your teen seems withdrawn, experiences a change in his sleep patterns, or starts to perform badly in school, schedule an appointment with your teen’s physician or contact a mental health professional.
2. Bullying
Talk to your teen about bullying regularly. Discuss what she can do when she witnesses bullying and talk about options if she becomes a target.
3. Sexual Activity
Surveys also show most parents don’t believe their children are sexually active. Talk to your teen about sex, even if you don’t think your child is sexually active.
4. Drug Use
Hold regular conversations about the dangers of drugs. And don’t forget to mention the dangers of prescription drugs. Many teens do not recognize the dangers of taking a friend’s prescription or popping a few pills that are not prescribed to them.
5. Alcohol Use
Have regular conversations about the risks of underage drinking. Educate your teen about the dangers. Express your disapproval of underage drinking and why it can be dangerous for teenagers.
It can go a long way to reducing your teen’s risk.
6. Obesity
Surveys show parents are bad at recognizing when their kids are overweight. They tend to underestimate their child’s size and the risks associated with being overweight. Talk to your child’s pediatrician about the weight and body mass are appropriate for your teen’s height and age and inquire about the steps you can take to ensure your teen is healthy.

7. Academic Problems
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It’s no longer just the “troubled teens” who are dropping out of school. Some teens feel so much pressure to get into a good college that they’re burning themselves out before they graduate from high school.
Stay involved in your teen’s education. Provide support and guidance and be ready to assist your teen if he encounters problems.
8.. Peer Pressure
Give your teen skills to make healthy choices and to resist peer pressure. Talk to your teen about what to do if she makes a mistake. Sometimes, kids can make poor choices and may be too afraid to seek help. Encourage your teen to talk you when he or she makes a mistake.
9. Social Media
Know what your teen is doing online. Educate yourself about the latest apps, websites, and social media pages teens are using and take steps to keep your teen safe.
10. On-Screen Violence
Pay attention to your teen’s media use. Talk to your teen about the dangers of being exposed to violent images and monitor your teen’s mental state.
How do you deal with a difficult teenager?

Changing Appearance
Keeping up with fashion is important to teens. That may mean wearing provocative or attention-seeking clothing or dyeing hair. Unless your teen wants tattoos, avoid criticizing and save your protests for the bigger issues. Fashions change, and so will your teen.
Changing appearance can be a red flag if it’s accompanied by problems at school or other negative changes in behavior, or if there’s evidence of cutting and self-harm or extreme weight loss or weight gain.
Increased arguments
As teens begin seeking independence, you will frequently butt heads and argue.
Constant escalation of arguments, violence at home, skipping school, getting in fights, and run-ins with the law are all red flag behaviors that go beyond the norm of teenage rebellion
Mood Swings
Hormones and developmental changes often mean that your teen will experience mood swings, irritable behavior, and struggle to manage his or her emotions.
Rapid changes in personality, falling grades, persistent sadness, anxiety, or sleep problems could indicate depression bullying, or another emotional health issue. Take any talk about suicide serious
Alcohol or drugs
Most teens will try alcohol and smoke a cigarette at some point. Many will even try marijuana. Talking to your kids frankly and openly about drugs and alcohol is one way to ensure it doesn’t progress further.
When alcohol or drug use becomes habitual, especially when it’s accompanied by problems at school or home, it may indicate a substance abuse issue or other underlying problems.
More Influenced by friends than parents
Friends become extremely important to teens and can have a great influence on their choices. As teens focus more on their peers, that inevitably means they withdraw from you. It may leave you feeling hurt, but it doesn’t mean your teen doesn’t still need your love.
Red flags include a sudden change in peer group (especially if the new friends encourage negative behavior), refusing to comply with reasonable rules and boundaries, or avoiding the consequences of bad behavior by lying. Your teen spending too much time alone can also indicate problems.
Professional help for a troubled teen
If you identify red flag behaviors in your teen, consult a doctor, counselor, therapist, or other mental health professional for help finding appropriate treatment.
Even when you seek professional help for your teen, though, that doesn’t mean that your job is done—it’s just begun. As detailed below, there are many things you can do at home to help your teen and improve the relationship between you. And you don’t need to wait for a diagnosis to start putting them into practice.

Dealing with angry teens

Anger can be a challenging emotion for many teens as it often masks other underlying emotions such as frustration, embarrassment, sadness, hurt, fear, shame, or vulnerability. When teens can’t cope with these feelings, they may lash out, putting themselves and others at risk. In their teens, many boys have difficulty recognizing their feelings, let alone being able to express them or ask for help.

At a time when both you and your teen are calm, explain that there’s nothing wrong with feeling anger, but there are unacceptable ways of expressing it. If your teen lashes out, for example, he or she will have to face the consequences—loss of privileges or even police involvement. Teens need boundaries and rules, now more than ever.
. Is your child sad or depressed? For example, does your teen have feelings of inadequacy because his or her peers have things that your child doesn’t? Does your teen just need someone to listen to him or her without judgment?
. Does your teen get headaches or start to pace before exploding with rage? Or does a certain class at school always trigger anger? When teens can identify the warning signs that their temper is starting to boil, it allows them to take steps to defuse the anger before it gets out of control.
Exercise is especially effective: running, biking, climbing or team sports. Even simply hitting a punch bag or a pillow can help relieve tension and anger. Dancing or playing along to loud, angry music can also provide relief. Some teens also use art or writing to creatively express their anger.
When your teen is angry, allow him or her to retreat to a place where it’s safe to cool off. Don’t follow your teen and demand apologies or explanations while he or she is still raging; this will only prolong or escalate the anger, or even provoke a physical response.
.You can’t help your teen if you lose your temper as well. As difficult as it sounds, you have to remain calm and balanced no matter how much your child provokes you. If you or other members of your family scream, hit each other, or throw things, your teen will naturally assume that these are appropriate ways to express his or her anger as well.

Connect with teen
It may seem hard to believe—given your child’s anger or indifference towards you—but teens still crave love, approval, and acceptance from their parents. Positive face-to-face connection is the quicke

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